Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Writing in Action

Writing in Action


Many educators are still addressing the increase in writing about text with the implementation of the 2011 ELA frameworks. This week I wanted to highlight two different resources for educators to reference as they address the need to increase writing within the curriculum.

Educators, parents and students often ask, “What does good student writing at this grade level look like?”
The answer lies in the writing itself.
This ESE derived project came out of the need for educators to have access to exemplar samples of grade level student work to help inform their teaching. On this site, educators can currently find writing samples of students in grades 2-8 for opinion/argument, inform/explain and narrate assignments. This project is currently a “work in progress” as they are requesting educators submit samples from their classroom. Their ultimate goal is to provide exemplars for grades K-12 in writing categories of argument/opinion, inform/explain and narrate. These exemplars are accompanied by teacher commentary and reasoning of what teachers should look for in high quality student writing. These samples are not only informative for teachers as they think about their own student writing, but can serve as student exemplars for educators to use within their classroom as instructional tools.


AchievetheCore.org is another website filled with samples of exemplar student writing along with annotation for educators and the original writing prompt. As I have probably referenced in a previous lesson, Achieve the Core also houses hundreds of lessons aligned to the common core standards. This website houses more student exemplars, teacher comments and prompt information when compared to the Writing Standards in Action website.


What I love about these resources is that both offer authentic examples of student writing. They offer teacher insight into what exemplar grade level writing should look like, and can also be used as models and teaching points within classrooms.

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